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April 05, 2006

Comments

yomister


I'm not sure if this is of any assistance, but there are some scholarships available from the DOE for getting a license in a shortage area (TESOL, math, science). Preference appears to be given to new recruits, but appointed teachers may be considered. You may have already seen these offers, but here's the link and the qualification summary:

http://www.nycenet.edu/TEACHNYC/ExperiencedTeachers/Incentive+and+Special+Programs.htm


Qualifications:

Pedagogical or clinical employees of the NYC Department of Education are not eligible to participate in the Scholarship Program unless they are currently appointed and have achieved tenure in a non-shortage area OR have not served as a pedagogical or clinical employee for the NYC DOE within the past two (2) years. Applicants who have already achieved NYS certification in the critical shortage area for which they are applying are not eligible. However, since this is a recruitment program, non-Department of Education employees will be given priority in the selection process.

Also, the DOE is desperate for librarians. My school gave out some information about getting a Masters in library science (long distance from an upstate college), with the note that the degree would almost certainly be subsidized. Perhaps you could track down the personnel-hiring person with DOE?

Good luck with the search and I'll keep my ears open for other possibilities.


He Who Can't. . .

Thanks, yo. I am aware of that program. It is, as is clearly stated, a recruitment program, not a retention program. Also, notice that if I were a math teacher with a NYS provisional certification I wouldn't qualify, but would still be required to obtain a master's degree. Despite the fact that NY's teacher problem has really shifted from recruitment to retention, I still know of no across the board retention program. Any other business knows the value of investing in their employees, but the DOE hasn't caught up yet.

Miss M.

I assume that Yo Mister gave you info on the Teaching Opportunity Program- if not, it may be worth looking into as it's totally free. I finished it two years ago, and most of the people in the program had been teaching and were getting close to that five year mark where they needed the masters. It was my second masters, but I was the only one out of about 25. Good luck.

H.W.C.

Miss M,
Here's a quote from the TOP program website:
"Note: this program is designed to bring new teachers into the New York City public schools, and therefore is not open to persons who hold or qualify for New York State certification as a teacher or are close to qualifying for certification, ..."
TOP is a recruitment program. The point I was trying to make in that posting is that there is no effort being made to invest in the current employees, i.e. retention programs. There's nothing wrong with recruitment programs, of course, but I think NYC is getting a little heavy on them, especially when we have prospective teacher being turned away. My point is that NYC should invest more in retaining the teachers that they have because experienced teachers are one of the necessary components to quality education.
The quality of the education available at CCNY and other univerisities that typically participate in these recruitment programs is another matter. . .
P.S. Don't worry about me, I've been accepted to Bard's MAT program. Hopefully when I finish up I will be qualify for Teacher of Tomorrow loan forgiveness, because even with a (provately funded) fellowship fufilling this requirement is going to cost me a lot of money is lost pay. Of course I can only qualify for TOT if I teach in a SURR school, so that isn't exactly an "across-the-board" retention program is it? In fact, it is another way of recruiting teachers to work in SURR schools.

walter brown

wow...tough story

G

You keep spelling "license" wrong, and it's very annoying.

Maks

Interesting game about the submarine! Very long and with the not bad drawing.

kate

I recently happened across KDS (Knowledge Delivery Systems.) I was already a qualified teacher, but their program helped me stay a qualified teacher. I was able to get the credits I needed from the comfort of my own home for only $60 a course. I watched an online video, took a quiz and proceeded on to the next lesson. At the end of the course I sent in a “final” exam and was awarded the credit for that course. I was able to get the credits needed for my recertification in the short amount of time I had. Check it out at www.kdsi.org.

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